28th Jan 1917 -Brig-Gen Smyth, VC, takes command of AIF 2nd Div.

General Legge fell ill with the flu and the opportunity was taken to relieve him of command of the AIF 2nd Division, where upon he returned to Australia. Legge was replaced by Brig-Gen Smyth, VC. Smyth commanded the 2nd Division during the pursuit of the Germans to the Hindenburg line and the capture of Bapaume, followed by the battles of Bullecourt and 3rd Ypres. As a result of his Sudan experience, Smyth was particularly adept in planning highly successful ‘peaceful penetration’ raids on the German trenches.

23rd Jan 1917 – 22nd Battalion inspected by Brig-Gen Smyth, VC

The 22nd Battalion was inspected on parade by Maj-Gen Sir NM Smyth, VC, soon to be commanding the AIF 2nd Division. Smyth replaced General Legge who having fallen ill with the flu was relieved of his command and returned to Australia. At the Gallipoli evacuation in December 1915, Smyth was one of the last officers to leave the peninsula. As Major General in command of the AIF 2nd Division he was involved in the pursuit of the Germans to the Hindenburg line, and the capture of Bapaume in the spring of 1917 were followed by the battles of Bullecourt and 3rd Ypres. As a result of his Sudan experience, Smyth was particularly adept in planning highly successful ‘peaceful penetration’ raids on the German trenches.

22nd Jan 1917 – successful German raid against 36th Bn in Flanders

A successful German raiding party on 36th Battalion AIF 3rd Division to the south of the Lys in Flanders leaves 11 Australian killed, 36 wounded and 4 taken prisoner. This was one of only two successful raids out of eight by the Germans against the AIF 3rd Division from the beginning of the New Year until 13th March.

17th Jan 1917 – start of bitterly cold spell

A heavy fall of snow fell which lasted in the bitter cold for exactly a month. Food was carried forward but water had to be melted from the ice in shell holes. However the cold was preferable to the mud. The ground was dry, trench walls ceased to fall in and men could move around and stamp their feet without creating a quagmire. It was also easier to bring food up to the front. At this time the number of cases of trench feet diminished. However, it also became more obvious which trenches were manned and posts garrisoned, this harassing fire became more precise.

2nd Jan 1917 – 22nd Battalion takes over Firing Line

The Battalion relieved left company of 21st Battalion in Spring and Spectrum trenches in the Firing Line, and took over new line from 6th Dorset Regiment, British 51st Brigade. This new sector was found to be in an extremely bad condition filled with mud and water. Enemy snipers very active and causing much annoyance amongst the men.